About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
MSNBC 22
MSNBCW 22
CSPAN 18
FOXNEWS 15
CSPAN2 13
WRC (NBC) 5
KNTV (NBC) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
FBC 2
KGO (ABC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
CNNW 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 141
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)
affect future laws and could overturn as many as 170 laws on the books. so this would be endlessly litigated and gives union bosses more authority than the legislature. >> so, what kind of laws would be -- that have been passed that most people in michigan would say, we have come to live with them, the were settled democratically, people agreed, the legislature passed them, the for signed them. we had elections afterwards. what laws would be overturned? >> there are two laws in particular that they're concerned about. one is the so-called 80-20 law which says that taxpayers don't need to pay more than 80% of public employees pension benefits. and the other one is a law basically regarding teachers. the fact that there have been some school reforms that have allowed various merit measures and teacher promotion measures that could also be overturned by this. this is something that michelle rei, the former dc schools chancellor who runs a students first group, is very concerned about and her group made a big ad in michigan to fight this. >> governor rick snyder, the republican in mich
of the indianapolis star, piloting the senate race there. they said results are flawed. they indicate laws wants a toss up is now a double digit lead for his opponent. most significantly, women voters are driving the divide, according to the new poll. joe donnelly with 47% support. richard murdock support. and the libertarian getting about 6% of that support. silver like indiana. paul on our line for republicans. good morning. caller: good morning. host: your reactions on what is going on in your state? caller: our country was built on a religious freedom and also, in our old west -- and in the history of becoming a free country, a lot of our beliefs were made of on the bible. they say life begins at conception. and have been hearing democrats talk about rich people. but you know, i think there are just as many or more rich people and the democrat sector of politics than there are republicans. because republicans did very heavily to charity. host: tell me who you are voting for in the senate race? caller: i will vote for the republicans. host: richard murdock was to mark the bank yes sir. i beli
working on an administrative issue through law school and was very interested in how admissions worked and how students did after they graduated and it didn't take long to sort of look at what was happening, to sense something like "mismatch" might be important. we were admitting large preferences, and 90% chance of graduating only a 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. that meant only 45% of students we were admitting actually went on to smoothly go through law school and get their law degrees. wasn't hard to look at other schools in los angeles where students wouldn't have gotten in without references to see that those students had better outcomes. us started looking into this and look for a relevant database to test this and in 2004-2005 developed the paper that first discusses the issue in law school context and found this is quite a large problem, nationally the great bulk of minority students especially african-american students were receiving large preferences on a scale of a couple hundred spt points. traits were generally poor for this group. only a third of black starting
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] >>> voter suppression law has an ugly link to the 2000 voting mess. that's next. a cup of johan is a 600 horsepower sports coupe that likes to hug curves. ♪ your curves. smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast-
of the biggest tax increases since 1980 facing us. >> huge. >> if, under current law, nothing is done. we have a list of these tax increases. >> the lowlights. >> yes. expiration of the bush cuts, a lot of the tax increase. the personal income tax brackets which are now going to pop up again, taxes on investment, a lot of of the obamacare taxes, 22 billion starts this year. that includes the new tax on investment there. >> 3.8% on people who make above $200,000, and medical devices, one of the most -- a real growth industry. >> i mean, that's one of those that you can't figure out how that became law but it did and we have to live with it. i want to emphasize, we get idea to talking about ten-year plans. this is in 2013, 500 billion -- you're talking about a tax increase of over 3% of gdp. so this is a massive blow to the economy that is going to happen unless congress acts or we get a new president with a new direction. >> steve, you talked to a lot of people in the business community. how are they reacting to this prospect? is this affecting the chance we could go over this tax? is it affect
in the question when i was innocently working on the administrative issues for the law school that i taught, and i was very interested in the idea of academic sports, missions work, and it didn't take long to sort of look at what was happening to sense that something like a mismatch might be important. we were admitting students at ucla with large preferences who have a 90% chance of congratulating the only 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. so that i cumulatively meant that only 45% of the students with large preferences that were admitting went on to go through law school and get their degrees. it wasn't hard to look at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were
and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current a
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
at 6:00, a vallejo man is behind bars for a series of arson, including one that injured a law office. they linked mod love to a jun fire at the mortuary and church fire in july and september fire at the office of mayor davis. firefighters extinguished those flames within minutes. a search of court records shows the suspect and mayor davis might have been acquainted. a plaintiff by the name of mod love is having filed a case against davis in small claims court in 2005. that was two years before davis became mayor. details on the case or who won that case were not available. the police say the investigation is not yet finished. >> the man a former yahoo! executive living with his wife and kids in san francisco's valley and year ago moved to new york and just last night they were shattered aeldly by their own nanny. the krims moved to the bay area before going to manhattan and took a job at ccnbc, they found the children dead in a bathtub. the family's 50-year-old nanny was lying nearby with a knife by her side. >> we know she was referred by another family, that an employee of this fam
by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, but they were demagogue is racist, racist, racist. when nixon says law and order we know what is really talking about. instituted by bye bye reagan-bush judges and rudy giuliani, bless his soul from new york city, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was finally reformed tens of thousands of black lives were saved in a different way. welfare was so successful in law and order bills were so successful they were claiming credit for both. so we had 12 years of paradise within the chapter, post-o.j. paradise and many wonderful things that happened. most of all people were not walking on egg shells anymore. add to the list of words you just mentioned. people would worry about that you would innocently say a word and it he would ruin your career and you would be hated by all of humankind. that was over after oj and a lot of the change after oj was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago and along comes barack obama the most li
. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was convenient. if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romney lately. we did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think every
out of an airplane. it happens at the largest he jumped into is a church yard. my mother-in-law joked that was if anything went wrong we could wheel him straight on into the church. but he's doing very well. they're both doing really great and we treasure our time with them. general na is going every month to get video footage of her grandparents and telling stories and she wants to have that both for his library but also just for her and all of the family to have this footage of them because they're so terrific. now let's g get to what we're really here for which is to thank you all very very much and to encourage you to keep working every single day, keep going door to door and making those phone calls and make sure all of those people you contacted turn out to vote on november 6. it's really really important that we have the ground game that wins which and i think you all have set it up so that's what we'll have in michigan and i want to thank you all for that very much. i've been with ann romneywe did a reception together in oklahoma city and she is so terrific. and i think everyo
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
exploded. the court decision wiped away the gray area in our campaign finance law. so now there are no limits to what outside groups can do. and so what we're seeing now is an explosion in that area. although it's a problem that existed before citizens united. >> i want to pick up on what leslie was saying earlier. the 501(c)(3)s -- these are all named obviously for the codes, for the tax codes. the 501(c)(3)s where we actually see an enormous number of progressive action going on in these non-profits, they are barred. they can't write these checks. so to me that's where it feels like there is part of this critical asymmetry occurring. is that right, the difference between the threes and fours. >> there are ones that aren't ideological at all. sometimes the group that benefits a local library is a 501(c)(3). it's charitable organization. a c-4 can spend in elections. because there are so many wealthy donors and corporations on the right, this election cycle to defeat president obama, they are pouring money into these groups that don't have disclose -- >> that $74 million s
the healthcare law pushed through without considering republican options. and i think that poisoned everything for moving forward. so i would strongly disagree with that in terms of he had plenty of chances to deliver on the promises he made and he didn't. and during that period he chose not to work with republicans. host: next up is fill in north carolina on our independent line. caller: i just wanted to say that despite the media blackout gary johnson is going to have a profound impact on this election. he's got my vote because the democrats talk peace and kill 178 children with drone warfare in pakistan and they say that's not tough enough. and i don't know how many dead children it would take to satisfy mitt romney and the republicans. guest: talk to us about the effects as you see them of third party candidates on the republican effort in north carolina. guest: right now from what we're seeing it doesn't look like it's having an impact. to the extent they are drawing folks out it's from both parties and doesn't look like it's going to impact the presidential race or other races where libe
, and we need to think about the risks they may post to other people. and lastly under current law before turn to part about health reform, i just would be remiss if i didn't point out in terms of access that there are some eligibility gaps in the snap. now be for some legal immigrants and unemployed childless adults who face a three-month time in a three month time limit has been suspended in most parts of the country during the recession. but basically if you don't have shown and you're between 18-29 you can only get food stamps, snap for three months. over a three-year period. if you're not working. and so that time limit will be coming back in the coming years and is really a serious weakness in the program. and we can talk, if people want to comment about what some of the other changes that are legislative the under consideration in coming, in congress right now. if folks want to go there but i'm going to skip that. most of what i want to talk about, looking forward to the next few years, what is the future of the snap access, and we were think as i said, about packaging step with ot
reproduction. it's about the economy, that it's about race. when we think about jim crow laws, it was all about not allowing people of two different races to reproduce. i hadn't quite put it all together until i heard you say that, so i don't want other folks to misses that. and yet surprisingly the gender gap is less extreme than i might think it would be given these circumstances. is it -- when i look at the numbers, it says to me, yes, there's a gender gap, but it's still being driven primarily by women of color and by young women. so what's going on not just with the extremes of the republican party, but with women who hear this and i'm like, yeah, i'm town with them. what is that some. >> the conventional wisdom is when the republicans say these extreme things, those women will be turned off and vote if democrats. i don't think that's necessarily the case. it's not that they don't reject what is being said, because they do. but at the same time sometimes if you're independent and you are dead on the in middle, it's because you're turned off by booth pa both party. so democrats have to reme
by the military in war zones. but they're also increasingly used by law enforcement here at home. cbs 5 reporter patrick receive de owe got a demonstration in the east bay. >> reporter: by definition it's a drone. absolutely. it's likely you'll see more unmanned remote control cause like these flying over active crime scenes. >> callouts, search and rescue missions and persons with firearms. >> reporter: law enforcement officials would count the gunman in vallejo last year who killed an officer and how this equipment could have helped. >> it would have been a lot better to deploy one of these unmanned aerial systems and see where person is hiding and take him into custody that way. >> as opposed to $1,500 an hour for a powered aircraft. that saves big money. this is all part of operation urban shield. the drone comes equipped with high-tech accessories like night vision, cameras and even see heat. >> this system would have saved the life of an alzheimer's patient from an incident that happened overnight. >> reporter: what was once considered an expensive toy now seriously considered as a cleaner
the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> after losing nine million jobs in the great recession, our businesses have now add more than five million jobs over the past two and a half years, manufacturing is at its highest level since the '90s, unemployment has fallen to hit lowest level since i took office. home sales are rising, asemi lines are humming again. >> that as president obama in iowa, touting an economic turn-around he was saying that was just getting started. the economy is growing at a sluggish 2% and weak corporate earnings leading to one of the biggest dow selloffs of the year, we're back with dan henninger, and dan freeman, and mary anastasia o'grady. >> steve, happy days are here again? >> yeah. hardly. the problem with the speech that president barack obama showed is nobody really believes that, paul, and these new numbers on gdp show that this is an economy that is still suffering from what i call chronic fatigue syndrome. just isn't picking up the way normal recovery would. and what we're seeing in
republicans who worked traditionally with democrats of the past, he focused on getting the health care law passed through without considering the republican option. i think that poisoned the well for moving forward. i would strongly disagree in term of the fact he had plenty of chances, especially the first two years to deliver on the promises he made, he didn't. even during that period he wasn't working and chose not to work with republicans. >> next up is phil in hendersonville, north carolina. he's on our line for independents. go ahead, phil. >> hi, i wanted say i think despite the media blackout, gary johnson's going to have a profound impact on this election and even more so in four years. he's got my vote because the democrats are -- they talked and killed 170 children in drone warfare in pakistan and republicans say gosh, that's weak. we're not being tough enough. i don't know how many dead children it would take to satisfy mitt romney in the republicans' blood lust. >> gideon moore in mecklenberg county, talk to us about the effects as you see them of third party candidates on the
pensions for one job our investigation so outraged politicians in springfield that they passed a law to stop it. they go on leave from the city and then base their pensions on their much higher union salary that pension reform had rare bipartisan support the teachers' union and other union leaders now say the law went too far. jesse sharkey is the no. 2 guy with the chicago teachers union. what's wrong with it is a couple of things, number one he points to this library assistant whose pension could be cut by more than half under the new law when she took a leave of absence from the city to work for the union her salary doubled she then not only got her city pension but a second retirement deal for reunion work. house minority leader tom cross sponsored the bill to stop what the library assistant and dozens of other union workers had been doing. she is still going to have a pension that she is entitled to as the library at she's just not getting that second pension working for the teachers' union. this begs the question if they build and received bipartisan support makes a very small
democrat voted against and did not become law and the government did not shut down. >> moderator: gentlemen let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking about taking up a little later but since it's on the table congressman's dold your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes he did not break with your leaders even want once and not let the tea party to pull congress to the friends. what is your response to that? dold: my response is that was 24 votes if "the washington post" is correct. 24 this was passed with the majority and 10 of those votes danny hoyer voted with but do you know what's interesting about those votes? not a single vote talks about health care or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
sister-in-law came upstairs. we've got a two-story house. she was downstairs. a guy had come up to the door that we have downstairs in a room and started shaking saying, i'm brian let me in. let me in. i'm in trouble. let me in. that scared the hell out of her. a guy we don't know at all. she ran upstairs, called the police and said can you help me with what is going on downstairs. i went down and there was a crazy guy in our yard. he had been all over the neighborhood. he had gone to four different houses. he threw a stone through a starbucks, etc. when i looked outside, he was in the driveway. thank god the cops had shown up. he's yelling at the cops, he won't back down. the police started walking towards him and towards the house. you know what he did, he bolted to our backyard and then broke down our back door and was in our living room. at this point i have jenny my sister-in-law, my wife, my newborn daughter, they were curious. they wanted to see what was happening with the police i got them upstairs right away. i turned on the lights and let the cops in. it all happened t
't the states for the states run goods and services. regulatory laws governing the market shall be constrained by applicable sections of the constitution as amended. congress has six years from the date of ramification to adjust the current law and eliminate federal organizations and payment to the steve organizations to support or provide marketable goods and services. >> moderator: thank you. mr. macgovern? macgovern: i wouldn't support the bailout of government failed businesses. i believe and as i've said many times, free-market and free - a credit more wealth, more prosperity for more people than any other system coming and you have to be free to succeed, but you also have to be free to fail. orderly bankruptcy would have occurred part another company never took a nickel and survived and that is the way that i would have proceeded on that point. the government doesn't have any money. we are sending our children and grandchildren is money, so let the free market work. >> moderator: mr. moss? moss: the free market did really well. after the second world war when the united states was a grow
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
? are their pockets for the u.s. takes law enforcement? >> there are exceptions. there are still exceptions. one reason let me now have concluded as the frame that is being used by policymakers, the frame is not about investing. it is about capital expenditures when should be about operating expenditures. the frame is about government as believed. we're trying to work with our customers in those cities where we see receptive ears a meeting the leaders are hungry for really profound changes in the way the city operates. some of these are not the usual suspects. chattanooga, not the city on because you would expect on the left bank or otherwise. they decided to make the investment in building out broadband to every building in the city. piercing the economic benefits. it is not just the city government. it was their other vehicles. they were being smart. connecting the dots are hard. we're trying to break down the silo which tends to be the frame for which they think about it rather than looking across all of the boundaries to say what is it that is going to force collaboration and open the system
attack as a law enforcement matter, not as part of the war on terror, but as if it is a bank robbery. what we should have done with that suspect, when we learned he was in turkish custody was tell the turkish authorities, we want him. don't send him back to tunisia. this is not a matter of international extradition. this is a matter of taking somebody who has been engaged in war against the united states and we want him. we want hill and want to take him to gitmo to interrogate him. jon: i'm reminded when a couple of the suspect iss in the attack on the uss cole were apprehended and given back to yemen to be held in custody there. they escaped. so here is this tunisia guy, wanted in connection with the attack on our consulate there. apparently we have video and facial recognition software that puts him in our compound the night of the attack and yet he has been released, picked up by the turks but released to tunisia custody? >> this whole thing is like a reversion to before the original 9/11 in 2001. the clinton administration, these terrorist attacks, the world trade center, the fi
. the question is can facebook take down what it doesn't like. under the current state of the law it can. facebook is a private entity. it's owned by millions of shareholders. it's not regulated by the first amendment. it can restrict speech it doesn't agree with. that might harm its popularity and the value of its shares of stock, that might cause a competing program or web site to come into existence. but it's not against the law. megyn: somebody thought this might harm facebook by having a message posted by this group of navy seals who have a question about how president obama handle libya. some boss pat facebook said no you won't. >> this was probably a political judgment. they do not and none of the president's people want to discuss this issue. he has a very, very serious incompetent lapse of judgment which allowed americans to be killed when they were fighting to protect other americans. megyn: soment in media don't want to skits. and now facebook? it's one thing if they are not going to talk about it themselves. but to censor private speech about it critical of the president. mik
contributions. that's been the law for more than 40 years and it still is. they're about to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to but they can't make contributions. presidential candidates raise money at the national level. -- a maximum levels. there are a loft of wealthy individuals who support them. so the obama campaign stands out in that respect a little bit. the caller is making another point which is that the money in this race this year has been much more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. the attention in this spending is focused on a small number of people who have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that gets you to a majority of the money -- about 60% of the outside money has been raced from about 200 individuals. so the number of people you could fit on an airplane have been an important group in funding these outside efforts this year. and that's different and i think we need to watch to see whether those financial resources can become more important in elections. that's a que
the law, because there are laws on the books that prevent these things from taking some shapes. but we've seen in europe, asia and other parts of the world really interesting ways of inventing the process of partnering that don't involve giving away public assets and public goods. nobody's talking about that. >> i think the other thing, and i talked about this earlier, i think some structural changes need to be made to how government functions. right now there is, there are very, very, very few cities who have any type of an entity that's tasked with looking out and across. and the way cities are set up now, the way agencies are set up now, the way the budgets are allocated, they do not foster innovation. you can go to pretty much any agency in any city in this country, okay, and their planning budget, their project plan has been set up for the next three to five years. it doesn't foster innovation. and so having, creating an entity that is empowered, okay, to find innovation, to drive innovation across these agencies that has a budge is one -- budget is one of the steps to get there.
, the act that was signed into law this summer will end up raising some of the prices, but that is because policy makers here in washington had decided more important that the program be structural and financially sound and show it continues to exist to protect consumers. host: if somebody had a house on the jersey shore and they wanted to buy flood insurance, would be expensive? guest: you would need to talk --- each individual needs to talk to their agent and broker. if you don't have one, go to entrusted the choice that, and fined one during that agent and broker would help you walk through the flood insurance application process and determination of what flood zone you are in. host: we have this tweet -- guest: yes, i know exactly what he's referring to. this happened in katrina. there was some uncertainty about what caused a particular structural damage. in katrina you had all lots of houses and structures completely wiped off. the only thing left was a slab of concrete. and so, it was very difficult to determine whether the damage was caused by the wind associated with katrina or whe
and his daughter-in-law who ty woods left, and we've now basically assured this child of a financial future, and i'm just thrilled that the american people have done it and want to thank fox news for doing it. i first announced it on your show last week. >> we appreciate it, dick. he's going to be here with his whole family. they're going to be in studio just coming up in a short bit here. thank for being with us. >>> also coming up tonight, the east coast is getting pummeled at this hour by hurricane sandy. we continue to track this monster storm and assess the damage all throughout the special hour of hannity, and then first it was the ad that compared losing your virginity to voting for obama. now the president's supporters are upping the ante and exploiting children. this ad will anger you. we'll play it tonight on hannity hannity. ann coulter straight ahead. this happy couple used capital one venture miles for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" ma
boggling that they have been able to pass laws on this lie. but when a law isn't created to solve a problem, it is created to be a problem, and that's why we have gotten so many governors to veto these things. but what we're most worried about now are the dirty tricks that come out. we have seen robo calls going out in spanish, telling people to vote on the 8th not the 6th. >> stephanie: and you can vote by phone. >> exactly. >> stephanie: you would think if they are so confident they wouldn't have to resort to this. >> yeah, we saw the chairman of the republican party four or five years ago, say we can win without voter suppression, without vouter fraud and we can win on our ids. and that should be the motto. you do have people like governor snyder in michigan bob mcdonald in virginia who have taken great political risk but you have got a party that in too many places have been overrun by extremists who are willing to do whatever they can to win, and that's not what this country is about. >> stephanie: ben, i'm looking at the story in wisconsin, the romney wat
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)